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TABLE 1 NOTES | FOOTNOTES

                   
                   
                   
                   
                   

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TABLE NOTES: This table displays the reaction of Nickel with multiple deuterons. The criticism of these reactions, and others in Tables 1-10, is a proximity issue. How can a single nickel nuclei react with 7 or 8 deuterons at one time? The face-centered cubic arrangement of the nickel lattice might allow for 6 deuterons in lattice positions around any nickel atom, or 4 to 6 in non-lattice positions, unless of course there are multiple deuterons in any position.

Nevertheless, the fusion reactions for each of the four stable nickel isotopes with 1 to 10 deuterons is presented. Note that some of the results are ambiguous because the stable end products of the reactions are gasses that were not measured by Miley's experimental protocol.

Initial stable isotope products that were absent from Miley's final electrode are investigated further to see if their fusion products produce secondary or tertiary products resulting in a lower overall mass change.

The reaction    illustrates the search methods employed to find the lowest energy change for a reaction.

The reaction    is also ambiguous. 7030Zn, which normally occurs along a minorproduct pathway (0.4%), is present in Miley's final electrode, while 7032Ge, is not.However, the 7032Ge fission product(if it exists):

  is a possible Least Action outcome, but there is no way to test this hypothesis from Miley's data. In the case where the fission never occurs, the LANP model predicts that all of the product formation occurs along the minor least action path to 7030Zn, (mass change=-0.044952amu).